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A Battle Lost, a War Won

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A Battle Lost, a War Won

Samuel Braun, Staff Writer

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Thoughts of the 2016 presidential election often incite division among Americans, yet it did create one indisputable truth: that a woman could successfully run for the highest office in the land. Hillary Clinton undoubtedly holds varied opinions in the U.S. and around the world. However, being the first woman to ever be nominated for president by a major American party and succeeding in winning the popular vote has inspired more people of societal minorities to run for office than ever before.

Every two years, there are major state and federal elections with candidates for positions as governor, in the House of Representatives, and in the Senate. Traditionally, the U.S. state and federal governments have been dominated by white men. According to U.S. News and World Report, as of last year, white men make up 76% of Republicans and 65% of Democrats elected. Keep in mind that out of the total American population, white men only account for 31% of the population. Boiled down, statistic demonstrates how minorities in this country are not accurately represented in public office.

The recent election this past November challenged this precedent as numerous record were broken. Over all, the U.S. Congress saw an increase of 35 female lawmakers. This included the first two Native American women, the first Muslim woman, and the youngest woman (and person) ever elected. Additionally, Stacey Abrams was within less than a percentage point of being the first female African American governor of Georgia.

Despite all of this change, female and minority proportions in government still do not accurately portray the demographics of the U.S. population. Conversely, this past election cycle has proved to the country that women and people of other minorities are ready to truly represent their constituents. Hopefully in the future, this trend will continue, allowing for laws made for the people to perfectly match those that they govern.

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A Battle Lost, a War Won